Crop protection blog posts

05 April, 2018

7 secrets to a successful field trial

By Javier Bartolomé

Residues of plant protection products (PPPs) are inevitably present in or on food, even when they are applied in line with good agricultural practice. The upper limit of residue permitted on food or feed is the ‘maximum residue level’ (MRL), which, in Europe, is legislated by the European Commission based on scientific advice from the European Food Safety Authority.

MRLs are measured via crop residue field trials, which replicate the real-life agricultural conditions under which a plant protection product would be used. It sounds a simple enough procedure, but what studies are commonly used and what are the secrets to success?

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08 March, 2018

Future-proofing residue analysis services

By Stephen Brewin

The regulatory landscape across the globe is evolving at a fast rate, with more sophisticated requirements being placed on registrants and scientists. In parallel, scientific advances mean that methodologies once seen as cutting edge are becoming outdated and inadequate at addressing the new regulatory challenges.

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09 November, 2017

Bee studies - what can we measure and what should we measure?

By Matt Allan

Ecotoxicology is a relatively new study, less than 50 years old. Broadly it is defined as the study of harmful effects of chemicals on ecosystems, including individuals, populations and the environment. In discussing the effects on bees, it is important to also embrace the wider aspect of the effect on the colony of these social insects. 

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07 September, 2017

Powerful innovations in the advancement of ecotoxicology

By Matt Allan

Bees are ecologically important, as the world’s major pollinators. Out of the 100 crop species that provide 90% of food worldwide, 71 are estimated to be pollinated by bees [Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Global honey bee colony disorders and other threats to insect pollination, 2011]. Bees, specifically honeybees, have been used in experimental models for ecotoxicology studies. Other types of bees – bumblebees, solitary bees and stingless bees – are also important ecologically. New technologies now enable field and semi-field ecotoxicology studies of all types of bees and the assessment of new endpoints.

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23 April, 2017

6 ways a CRO can supercharge your PPP's time to market

By Kate Newell

The growing demand for safer, innovative plant protection products (PPP) makes bringing new products to market increasingly hard. Everything is changing, from buyer preferences through to weather components. Regulations are now wider and more stringent and farming practices continue to evolve rapidly. In addition, even existing active substances are always under scrutiny and potential review.

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23 April, 2017

Everything you need to know about biocides 101

By Kate Newell

Here you can find all you ought to know about biocides. Discover what they are, how they’re regulated, and the secrets to getting your product registered successfully.

What is a biocidal product?
In the words of the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA), a “biocidal product” means:

“. . .any substance or mixture, in the form in which it is supplied to the user, or generated from that form, containing or generating one or more active substances, with the intention of destroying, deterring, rendering harmless, preventing the action of, or otherwise exerting a controlling effect on, any harmful organism by any means other than mere physical or mechanical action.”

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23 April, 2017

Will the proposed ECHA ED guidance disrupt your biocidal and plant protection product projects?

By Kate Newell

Here’s everything you need to answer that vital question. . .

In December 2016, ECHA released details of important new guidance being developed. The guidance covers how to identify substances with endocrine-disrupting (ED) properties, in plant protection and biocidal products.

It is essential to begin by defining the scope of the draft guidance. Here you’ll discover exactly what’s being proposed, and how it could affect your registration.

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